OJAFR Latest Issues

Previous issue | Next issue | Archive

Volume 6 (6); 25 November 2016 


Review

Documenting radiocarbon evidences, Y-chromosome, mitochondrial DNA and autosomal markers on origin of domestication and routes of goat global divergence: a review. 

Tarekegn GM, Zhang W, Mwai O, Dessie T, Djikeng A, Tesfaye K.

Online J. Anim. Feed Res., 6(6): 113-124, 2016; pii: S222877011600016-6

Abstract

Domestic goat is the first ruminant animal domesticated in the South-west Asia about 10,500 years ago from its Capra aegagrus and Capra falconeri ancestors. The archaeological evidence links its origin to the region from the Taurus Mountains of Turkey to Pakistan. Molecular data extends the origin upto the Balkans and Carpathian Mountain regions of Romania, and China. Domestic goat followed both the Mediterranean and Danubian routes to disperse into Europe, and the Silk Road and the Khyber Pass to disperse across Asia. From the six haplogroups (A, B, C, D, F and G) of domestic goat globally identified, haplogroup A has a global coverage of 89% in Asia, 98% in Europe, and absolute predominance (100%) in South and Central America; however, the African region is still poorly characterized. The predominance of haplogroups A could be as a result of its earliest domestication. Haplogroup B, C, D, F and G are very rare or even absent (e.g. haplogroups D) in Europe. Haplogroup C is present with very low frequencies in Europe (2%), Asia (1%) and in Mongolia. MtDNA lineage B was detected in few African countries and few countries in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Overall, population expansion events of the wild progenitors of domestic goats were occurred much earlier than the events of domestication.
Keywords: Capra aegagrus, Capra falconeri, domestic goat, genetic variation, haplogroup.

[Full text-PDF] [XML] [DOAJ]


Research Paper

Impact of gender determination through vent sexing on Cobb-500 broiler performance and carcass yield. 

Adnan Yousaf.

Online J. Anim. Feed Res., 6(6): 125-129, 2016; pii: S222877011600017-6

Abstract

The study was conducted order to explore the effect of separated sex rearing of broiler production performance. Total no of 24,000 Cobb-500 birds was reared for 42 days and divided in two group’s A =12000 male and B= 12,000 females, according to their sex with 4 replication in each treatment where each replication had 3000 birds.  They were provided the same feed and water adlibitum for the whole study. Initial body weight, temperature, humidity, feed intake, weekly body weight, mortality and final live weight of broiler were recorded. The study clearly shows significant differences (P< 0.05) in term of body weight gain and FCR of males chicks as compare to females. Male birds and also showed significantly (P< 0.05) better dressing percentage than female group. Male chicks had significantly (P< 0.05) larger chest circumference females birds. The cross with the fastest growth rate also had the highest mortality. Mortality percentage was high in male chicks 4% then female’s chicks 2%. The most profitable choice will be dependent on whether whole birds or parts are marketed and the relative values of the parts. All these findings together revealed that in separate sex growing male chicken showed better performance in terms of more production.
Keywords: Cobb-500 broiler, Vent Sexing, Growth Performance, FCR, Carcass

[Full text-PDF] [XML] [DOAJ]


Research Paper

Impact of semen quality of Aseel chicken on induced molting. 

Yousaf A, Rubab F, Shahnawaz R, Jamil T, Iqbal T, BiBi N, Haider I.

Online J. Anim. Feed Res., 6(6): 130-132, 2016; pii: S222877011600018-6

Abstract

Indigenous chickens are an important source of animal proteins.  Aseel is the very famous chicken breed of Pakistan which is facing the reproductive issues. Molting is economically used for the improvement of reproductive performance of male rosters. So the current experiment was designed to investigate the effect of molting on semen quality of indigenous Aseel chicken. Roosters (n=20) were divided into two groups, Group A molted (n=10) and group B non-molted (control) (n=10). Molting was performed through the method of feed restrictions. After the molting phase, semen was analyzed for six weeks. The semen quality was significantly (P< 0.05) improved in terms of volume (0.34±0.8 & 0.16±0.4 ml), mortality (73.7±2.5 & 63.5±2.2%), semen concentration (3.36±1.2 & 1.63±0.2 x 115/ml), morphological defect of sperm, (6.5±0.5 & 8.7±0.6 %) and livability of sperm (75±2.3 & 64±2.5%) were significant (P< 0.05) better for group A as group B. It was concluded that molting could be used for improvement of semen quality of indigenous Aseel chicken to cover the reproductive problems.
Key Words: Aseel chicks, Semen quality, Molting & NonMolting

[Full text-PDF] [XML] [DOAJ]


Previous issue | Next issue | Archive

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.